Tag Archives: Digital medium format

Making contact sheets in Capture One

Generating contact sheets using Capture One Pro 7 is a straightforward process. Follow these simple steps:

1. Begin by selecting all the frames you want to include followed by File > Print  (keyboard shortcut = ⌘P)

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2. In the dialogue box that opens:

Use the Page Setup button to select the paper size – A4 or A3

3. Open the Templates Tab and…

From the pop menu scroll down to Contact Sheets – Auto Fit before choosing the configuration that suits your needs.

Then click Print.

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4. In the subsequent print dialogue box choose the number of copies and on the PDF drop down (bottom left) click Save as PDF.

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5. Give it a name and a location before finally clicking Save.

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That’s all there is to it!

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(Another) 48 Hour Photo Project – 2013 – Post 5

Angie makes blue look slinky and eyebrows appear beyond redemption.

Angelika Wierzbicka 48

© Angelika Wierzbicka

There’s more of her work here on her URL

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Filed under Another 48 Hours, Phase One / Capture One, Studio portraits, Sudio photography

(Another) 48 Hour Photo Project – 2013 – Post 2

This time around we’ve got help in the form of loan equipment, advice, support, etc from the following partners:

The Flash CentreElinchrom flash, Go Pro‘s

Vemotion – video streaming over low bandwidth mobile phone network. Here’s the link to the stream:

http://www.vemotion.com/live/

Phase One – additional cameras to augment our existing kit, IQ 180’s & IQ 160’s

Eizo – a selection of high end FlexScan & ColorEdge 24 & 27 inch monitors for post-production

CJBS_24-06-13_022

© María Sotelo

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Filed under Another 48 Hours, Phase One / Capture One, Studio portraits, Sudio photography

Downloading Capture One Pro 8

In preparation for January and beginning to use the Phase One camera system you ought to be downloading the Capture One software, installing on your Mac & getting a feel for how it works.

Here’s how to do it….

Go to the download page of the Capture One URL

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Then add your email address as prompted and click the download button. The file should go to your downloads folder then open it up and copy to the ‘Applications’ folder.

When you open Capture One for the first you’ll see this dialogue box…

Capture One initial dialogue box

Select the ‘Run DB’ option. This will allow you to process the RAW files that the Phase generates but not those created by a third party camera such as a Nikon or Canon.

Remember that the Phase doesn’t generate anything but RAW’s!

When running Capture One make a point of quitting any unnecessary applications otherwise you may find that you machine crashes.

My opinion of Capture One, for what it’s worth – it’s the business! I find it easy and intuitive to use.

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Photographic Exposure – a simple guide

This is a post intended for my BA students but others may find it useful too.

PHOTOGRAPHIC EXPOSURE

This is controlled by 3 different though inter-related methods:

1. ISO

2. Shutter speed

3. Aperture

Finger

ISO

This is the speed or sensitivity of the camera’s sensor & is selected by the photographer. Formally it was the sensitivity of the film that you chose to load into the camera.

At the time of writing (Sep 2012) most Nikon DSLR’s use 200 ISO as their base position whereas Canon’s begin at 100 ISO (though higher spec models have a greater range).

The lower the ISO value that is selected the less the sensitivity to light that the sensor will have and the less the electronic noise/interference that will result.

As a general rule you choose a low ISO when you have a lot of light to work with and you increase the ISO to higher values as lighting conditions become darker.

The progression of ISO values you can expect to find on a DSLR are:

100   200   400   800   1600   3200   6400 +

Each time the ISO value doubles or halves this is referred to as making an adjustment that is equivalent to 1 f-stop (more on this later).

On film the common ISO progressions are:

50   100   200   400   800   1600   3200   6400 +

Offerings at San Andrés

SHUTTER SPEED

This is the time for which the shutter is open and the sensor or  film is exposed to light.

Shutter speeds are referred to as being either slow (when the sutter is open for a longer time) and fast (when the shutter is open for a short time).

You select the speed to suit what you are wanting to achieve as well as for the conditions under which you are working.

As a general rule:

Slow speeds may result in camera shake so think about using a tripod.

Fast speeds for action photography where a clear, concise image is needed.

The progression is:

< 15sec  8 sec  4 sec  2 sec  1sec  1/2   1/4   1/8   1/15   1/30   1/60   1/125   1/250  1/500   1/1000   1/2000 >

There will also be a ‘B’ (bulb) setting. This allows you to open the shutter and it will remain open until you release it.

Some cameras &/or lenses have a ‘T’ (time) setting where you press once to open and again to close the shutter.

Both ‘B’ and ‘T’ as well as speeds slower than 1/8 sec should be used in conjunction with a cable release.

Jazz for Sax

APERTURE

This is the third (and sometimes most confusing) method for controlling exposure.

This refers to the diameter of the aperture formed by the iris diaphragm, which is a series mechanical blades built into the camera lens.

The diameter of this aperture is expressed as an f-number (f-no).

There is a set progression of f-no’s & each time you change this number you increase or decrease the amount of exposure by 1 f-stop. Thus the photographic convention of expressing exposure in f-stops. This is the inverse square law in action.

The size of the lens aperture influences both overall exposure AND the amount of subject that is in ‘acceptably’ sharp  focus – referred to as ‘Depth of Field’.

As photographers we need to consider how much depth of field we require in order to be able to achieve a given result. This in turn will influence the f-no we will want to select.

When the lens is fully open to it’s widest aperture there will be very little depth of field, when stopped down to a narrow (or small) aperture you will achieve greater depth of field.

Yet more confusion comes about because a wide aperture has a low numerical value (f1.4 or 2.8) whereas a small aperture has a high numeric value (f22).

Older, non auto-fucus lenses, will have their range of f-no’s inscribed on the barrel and sometimes also the intermediate positions which may be half of third f-stops. Thus you will hear people talk in terms of fractions of a stop when considering exposure.

The standard f-no progression is:

< f1.4   f2   f2.8   f4   f5.6   f8   f11   f16   f22   f32   f45   f64   f90   >

Beware though when using a DSLR. These cameras express the intervening fractional values as f-stops & this causes added confusion. On your cameras you will see f-no’s such as f9, f14, etc. But you will not see these marked on a lens barrel or a lightmeter.

In fact modern light/flahmeters will read a full f-stop followed by fractional units in tenths. So it just got more confusing!

An example of a lightmeter reading: 1/125 sec   f5.6 9

This translates as a shutter speed of 1/125th second with an aperture that is f5.6 & 9/10.

Your camera doesn’t work in tenths (yet!) so you have to be prepared to compromise & rounding up or down to the nearest full f-stop which, in this case, is f8 or the third of an f-stop interval if that is closest.

In actual fact a 1/10th of an f-stop is not going to make a huge difference to your exposure & if necessary can be adjusted in post.

Nighttime on the M11 motorway

Use these notes as a general guide, read around the subject for yourself & experiment so that this becomes familiar.

Further reading:

Diprose, G & Robbins, J (2012) Photography: The New Basics, Thames & Hudson

A first class read, thorough, easy to follow

Adams, A (1981) The Camera, New York Graphics Society

Old school and very technical, the best there is on the subject

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Wayland’s Smithy – mixed lighting

Adjacent to the Ridgeway, on the chalk downland above the Vale of the White Horse and under 2 miles walk from Uffington Castle and the White Horse itself. This shoot required carrying almost 60kgs of photographic equipment half a mile (0.8kms) from the car – surely one of the over-riding reasons why I took up this profession?

Wayland’s Smithy, take 1

Wayland’s Smithy, take 2

Details: Phase One c/w IQ160, 35mm, ISO 200, 1/4sec , f12

The difference between these two images is purely time. They are 5 minutes apart and in that time the ambient light level dropped by over 2 f-stops as the next rain storm approached.

Again the versatility of working with the Phase One & this time shooting tethered direct into a Mac enabled me to set-up, light & shoot all of this in just 3 frames. My intention was to frame this ancient chamber tomb with the silhouettes from the beech trees whilst lighting the the tomb entrance in particular in such a way to lead the eye inwards and add to the mystery of the place. Lit with a combination of Lumydine and Elinchrom Ranger lights supplied by TFC in London. Legend says (amongst other things I’m sure) that if you’re a traveller whose horse looses a shoe then leaving it overnight here will mean that when you return at dawn it will have been reshod by Wayland himself.

Two other essential tools to me on this shoot where:

The Photographer’s Ephemeris (more soon) in conjunction with the weather from the BBC online.

The Photographer’s Ephemeris

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48 Hour Photo Project, post O

Tuesday, 00.15, 19 June 2012

Zack gets reprimanded. Naomi Geczy’s take on Charles Dickens

© Naomi Geczy

Details: Phase One c/w IQ160, 55mm lens, ISO 50, 1/250sec,  f/11

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