Making contact sheets in Capture One

Generating contact sheets using Capture One Pro 7 is a straightforward process. Follow these simple steps:

1. Begin by selecting all the frames you want to include followed by File > Print  (keyboard shortcut = ⌘P)

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2. In the dialogue box that opens:

Use the Page Setup button to select the paper size – A4 or A3

3. Open the Templates Tab and…

From the pop menu scroll down to Contact Sheets – Auto Fit before choosing the configuration that suits your needs.

Then click Print.

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4. In the subsequent print dialogue box choose the number of copies and on the PDF drop down (bottom left) click Save as PDF.

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5. Give it a name and a location before finally clicking Save.

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That’s all there is to it!

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Terry Hawes dispenses advice

Learning to see it from your clients position is so valuable. You also see the different possibilities rather than just what was in the viewfinder.

Ravensbourne Digital Photography

Terry Hawes creative director, art director and graphic designer spent all of the second day of 48Hours helping and advising on shoots and edits.

With a background in print magazines at the BBC and tablet/online at Wired he stressed the need to think outside the viewfinder when composing to give your picture editor sufficient space to crop for both hard and electronic copy, especially as in the latter features like the gutter do not exist.

www.simpsonmagazine.cc

Level 2 student Peter Marshall reflects on his discussion with Terry 

I took full advantage of the opportunity to talk with Terry Hawes as having shot the night before I was finding it hard to narrow down my images to a final few. With his help we had soon picked out the best photos which really told the story of my shoot. We then went on to discuss how photographer’s and art director’s…

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(Another) 48 Hour Photo Project – 2013 – Post 5

Angie makes blue look slinky and eyebrows appear beyond redemption.

Angelika Wierzbicka 48

© Angelika Wierzbicka

There’s more of her work here on her URL

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Filed under Another 48 Hours, Phase One / Capture One, Studio portraits, Sudio photography

(Another) 48 Hour Photo Project – 2013 – Post 4

Amber makes wetness a virtue….

Amber Eggleden 48 Hours

See her work at Amber Eggleden

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(Another) 48 Hour Photo Project – 2013 – Post 3

The first video post goes up. Angelika Wierzbicka shoots in studio 4:

http://vimeo.com/69007785

Ange spent 5 hours shooting her model in 4 different changes working medium format throughout on Leica S & Phase One IQ160

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(Another) 48 Hour Photo Project – 2013 – Post 2

This time around we’ve got help in the form of loan equipment, advice, support, etc from the following partners:

The Flash CentreElinchrom flash, Go Pro‘s

Vemotion – video streaming over low bandwidth mobile phone network. Here’s the link to the stream:

http://www.vemotion.com/live/

Phase One – additional cameras to augment our existing kit, IQ 180’s & IQ 160’s

Eizo – a selection of high end FlexScan & ColorEdge 24 & 27 inch monitors for post-production

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© María Sotelo

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(Another) 48 Hour Photo Project – 2013 – Post 1

Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.

One year on from the first 48 Hour Photo Project here we are again set for a repeat performance with more photographers, more equipment and more fun. Wherever you are in the world just sit back & enjoy the posts as they roll out.

48HOURS_BEHIND_THE_SCENES-1

Ange uses a Leica S

First post is Angelika Wierzbicka using a Leica S to shoot Nichole from Paulo Ribeiro, the first fashion shoot of the day, Mon 24 June.

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The Impossible Instant Lab

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As someone who is/was a user and huge fan of Poloroid film and instant photography on all formats from 35mm through to 8×10 (20×24) I have to admit fascination and wonder at what The Impossible Project have just developed with the Impossible Instant Lab

Follow this link to see what they are up to:

http://www.125magazine.com/index.php?p_id=300&pg=654

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Jordi Valls at the Centre Pompidou

Appearing as his performance artist alter ego, Vagina Dentata Organ, the Catalan surrealist Jordi Valls will make a one off appearance at the Centre Pompidou on 17 April 2013. This is to coincide with the presentation of Albert Serra’s latest feature film, “Els Tres Porquets” (The Three Little Piggies) that is more than 100 hours long and deals with the themes of Hitler, Goethe and Fassbinder.

X-process Neg Scan Test

I’ve had a long and fruitful personal and professional relationship with Jordi going back many years. we have collaborated photographically more than once producing visually striking images in both colour and black & white. In between times we’ve shared food, wine and dry Martinis at the American Bar of the Savoy Hotel.

This image was made by shooting on transparency film then processing it as if it where a negative to give false colour rendition before hand printing it onto photographic paper. The unpredictability of the method means that the final result can only be ascertained from a modicum previous experience, the rest is down to chance. This image was made entirely in camera, processed by Metro Imaging, printed by my Galician friend Carlos.

Details: Hasselblad Flex Body, 50mm Distagon, 1/60sec, f4. Kodak Ektachrome E100VS X-Processed in C41

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Why QP Cards?

I started my photography career with analogue and the guys who I assisted and from whom I learnt; Gered Mankowitz, Dave Sherwin, Red Saunders, Gil Galvin and others, taught me the importance of accurately exposing film in camera.

Most images were being made on E6 stock; Kodak Ektachrome 64 and later Fuji 50D then Provia 100, the latitude for error was only about 2/3rd of a stop and over-exposure was not a possibility. Therefore it was fundamental to my practice to learn to correctly use the exposure meter, proof using Polaroid (later Fuji Instant) then relate that exposure to the film. It was common that films varied in colour caste and speed rating so each film batch would vary and needed to be compensated for in camera.

I still have a box of Polaroids in the attic of me posing in all sorts of sets and locations with the exposure and lighting diagram scribbled on the reverse.

When I switched to digital I began using QP Cards as a way of gauging and refining exposure. I felt the need to continue with a rigorous method of determining accurate exposure yet rather than examine Polaroids I now find myself judging the QP Card. I do this on the camera screen, in conjunction with the histogram and on a computer monitor when shooting tethered.

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Shoot with test frame selected

With the eyedropper tool selected I neutralise White Balance by clicking on the grey square of the QP Cards.

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Eye dropper tool selected

Then make any additional minor adjustments via the Tool Tabs for Exposure, Black & White conversion, etc.

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Tool Tabs bar for additional adjustments

Prior to copying the adjustments.

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Copy adjustments

Selecting all the relevant files & applying the saved adjustments to the entire batch.

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Apply adjustments

The beauty of this is the way that it simplifies and speeds up my workflow.

I use Capture One Pro 7 for my image management but Adobe Lightroom is just as suitable.

Remember that QP Cards are not fool proof, nothing is, but then neither is a histogram, a flashmeter or even a Polaroid. You need to combine all of these elements together plus your own innate experience of your camera or film and different lighting situations.

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Entrance to disused Cruise Missile Bunker, East Anglia
© Julian Hawkins 2013

Details: Nikon D600, 17 – 35mm, ISO 200, 1/2sec , f10

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