Tag Archives: Shadows and Light

File Formats: RAW v JPEG

RAW & JPEG are two different types of electronic file

The principal differences between the two types are:

  • RAW files are literally the raw data as produced by the camera at the moment of pressing the shutter
  • They have no ‘built in’ file format
  • You are then free to adjust this data through Photoshop or a similar application on a computer
  • You can change; exposure, white balance, contrast, brightness, etc
  • You can return all settings to the start point and begin again
  • A RAW file is, in effect, a digital negative

 

  • JPEG’s are generated by the camera after exposure & are written onto the memory card
  • Preset data for exposure, white balance, etc will be embedded in the file & can never be removed
  • The parameters are decided by you in advance
  • Your latitude to change & make alterations afterwards are very limited
  • The file will be compressed & this is achieved by discarding information that can never be retrieved

 

If you are working digitally then having a camera that will allow you to shoot in RAW format as well as JPEG can be an advantage.
However a JPEG that is produced by the camera at the same time as a RAW is not as satisfactory as one that you generate yourself from the RAW file during post-production.
Many DSLR’s will do both RAW & JPEG at the same time but this will reduce storage capacity.

 

Why shoot RAW?

  • When creating digital prints of the highest exhibition quality & size
  • Shooting high ISO values in low light
  • When you want to make high quality monochrome conversions
  • Photographing a subject with a high dynamic range
  • When you are uncertain about the colour temperature of the subject

 

Why shoot JPEG?

  • When the end result is for small scale or low quality output
  • If you need fast workflow
  • When you need low res images for web or onscreen use
  • When you need to shoot quickly
  • When the end result requires minimal post-production

4 Comments

Filed under Exposure, Lighting, Tech Tips

The View From The Bottom

Nadia Ryder is a dedicated, hard-working and creative photographer in the early stages of her career. She recently published this post online and is happy for me to share it. What she describes isn’t at all new…however it is becoming more and more common.
How do you feel about this? Why not check out here URL & see why she (along with many others) is worth being paid?

‘So sick of seeing ‘job alerts’ pop up for internships online. Let’s just call it what it is. Companies basically not wanting to spend their money on a job they think isn’t worth paying for, yet if the job isn’t worth paying for, why even ‘hire’ an intern? Clearly if it’s not worth paying for it isn’t essential to your business? Oh wait, except it is, you just don’t want to spend the money. Internships are a great way to gain experience and insight into an industry while networking and making contacts, sure, but some of the ads I have seen are just disgusting. “Photographer and clothes ironer needed, £5 per hour”. Are you fucking kidding me? What makes you think someone would want to snap that job up for under minimum wage? Another gem “intern needed to retouch fashion campaign for big prestigious brand. Unpaid” Well if the brand is so big and prestigious, why can’t they afford a fucking retoucher?

Do not fall for this shit. Sometimes it’s easy to tell when someone is looking to mug you off and sometimes it’s not, but don’t degrade yourself by being someone’s bitch just for a name on your CV. Sometimes it isn’t worth it. Obviously it’s a judgement call, but I’m tired of seeing people get mugged off.

Everyone in the creative industry do yourself a favour and actually appreciate the value of your work. The reason people approach you for ‘work’ is because they can’t do it themselves. So why devalue it and let them have it for free? You pay accountants, cleaners, lawyers, you name it, so pay the fucking photographer. If everyone took a stand and said no to free work, these companies would HAVE to pay. You’re only hurting yourself and all others in your profession by offering your services for free. Take pride in what you do and learn to say no.

Sorry/not sorry for the rant. I’m just so mad and sick to death of it.’

© Nadia Ryder, 2014 Reproduced with permission

2 Comments

Filed under Business Tips

Hugh Turvey’s Xograms

Hugh Turvey is a London based commercial photographer and artist in residence at the British Institute of Radiology. His solo show Xposé: Material and Surface is running at the at the Oxo Tower Wharf, London. 12-23 February, 2014. It’s free, it’s a treat so be sure to go and see it.
Here’s just a taste of what to expect:

Air © Hugh Turvey

Air © Hugh Turvey

Sage Composition © Hugh Turvey

Sage Composition © Hugh Turvey

Stiletto © Hugh Turvey

Stiletto © Hugh Turvey

Woman Drinking Water © Hugh Turvey

Woman Drinking Water © Hugh Turvey

Then read Kadhim Shubber’s interview from The Guardian.

4 Comments

Filed under Articles

Borough Market, Jan 2014 – Take 2

Paul Shelley took part in the Borough Market street photography workshop last month and shot with a Nikon D300. Afterwards he edited his shots then cropped and resized them to fit into the picture boxes on the PDF layout. He and I did a final session remotely so that we could discuss and feedback before making a final PDF with his final selection of shots in place, and here they are….

Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 07.10.49 Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 07.11.18 Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 07.11.41 Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 07.12.01

In Paul’s words, ‘I loved the day at the Borough. Thanks for your coaching and guidance. I have been working on the selection of pictures and have just weeded them so that I have now got the three sets.’

All photographs © Paul Shelley 2014

2 Comments

Filed under Trip Reports

Borough Market – January 2014

The first Shadows and Light workshop for 2014was shooting street photography at Borough Market, London, SE1 on January 18th.
To make this as realistic as possible to a commissioned photo shoot participants are invited to shoot their images to the specific requirements of an editorial brief, on the premise that a magazine has asked you to shoot a photo story about what makes the market vibrant and thriving.

On this occasion I decided to set myself a slightly different assignment, something that has grown out of a couple of recent conversations with Ed Kashi and his coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in NYC and commissions from Time Magazine and NBC.

Whilst the clients busied themselves with the task at hand I used whatever spare moments I had to shoot the same brief but just using my iPhone with the 645pro and Snapseed apps. Then I placed the my selected files into the In Design file & saved as pdf’s, as you can see below…

B_M_spread

Three spreads and a cover.
As part of the ‘homework’ with this workshop participants go away and edit 3 selections in Lightroom (or similar) then mail the jpegs across so that we can generate pdf’s, thus giving them the opportunity to see their images in the context of the finished magazine spread.

There will be another Borough Market workshop at the end of 2014 so why not come along?

All pictures © Julian Hawkins 2014

3 Comments

Filed under Trip Reports

2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,300 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

The Interview – Guglielmo Galvin, getting behind the mask (Part 3)

James Harries (now Lauren Harries)

James Harries (now Lauren Harries)

S&L. The story so far has to be that you depended very much on your strength of personality to charm and inveigle your way into the hearts of your sitters so that they couldn’t refuse to reveal something of their inner selfs to your camera. Then by doing  your own performance behind the camera just for them alone they felt more comfortable, probably thinking that they could never seem as crazy as you?

GG. And this is where the Hasselblad came into it’s own once again. By using the basic form without a prism I had to lift my gaze from the camera to look directly at the subject each time before I pressed the shutter.

S&L. So you found this beneficial for your process?

GG. Naturally! It meant I had a direct connection, eye to eye with them. I could do my own performance from behind the camera & shoot at just the right moment. No other camera gave me that facility.

S&L. You do realise that if you were working today someone would be making a little ‘behind the scenes’ movie of you at work then posting it across the social media? That way we could all see you in action.

GG. Yes, yes, I know. But would anybody really give a f**k? (laughs)

S&L. Well this way we all just have to imagine the scene.

Mickey Mouse

GG. A picture I’ve always liked was this one that I  did from Eurodisney. It’s interesting because I was lying on the floor to get a low viewpoint on this giant Mickey Mouse with a little girl who obviously looks frightened. And the PR woman said, ‘Gil you aren’t trying to make our Mickey Mouse look ridiculous are you?’ And I said, ‘Me? Make a 6 foot mouse look ridiculous’.

Brian Eno

Brian Eno

S&L. Tell me something about Brian Eno.

GG. Eno was for The Sunday Times and I went to his studio in south London and the only thing I noticed was that he had what I would call an art construction where he had a television that was on it’s side but the picture was the right way round. So that became an easy shot for me. And he’s still using that shot to this day as a self promo picture.

Basically he was looking directly at the camera & it was boring.But when he looked away it became a stronger shot so that’s what I got him to do. So again it was a very quick shot, all done within 20-30 minutes.

S&L. Yes, that’s the usual amount of time you get given.

GG. I always found that I worked at my optimum under that kind of pressure because I could get an image that was strong, not just ‘stand there’ and which is not a ‘character shot’ which is something I used to hate. There were a lot of those sort of images around and they were popular because there was an absence of fuss and often no lighting. And I know that those photographers despised my work too because they felt that I lacked gravitas.

S&L. So perhaps this is a good moment for the story behind the shoot with the aristocrats daughter?

GG. She was the daughter of a duke. I went upstairs and took a picture of her on the four poster bed. And she was unbelievably gauche, when I said, “move to the right”, she would move to the left, I’d say “face me”, and she’d look away. She just wasn’t able to follow instructions at all. Then I realised that she couldn’t understand my accent and I got intimidated by this. So eventually I went over to the bed where she was sitting, I grabbed her by the thighs and moved her, physically. As I did this I realised what I was doing and I dripped sweat onto her pale yellow skirt. The material showed my sweat stains very clearly on her lap so I then started to rub it with my hands in the hope that it would go away.

GG. and S&L. (Uncontrollable laughter)

GG. And then I freaked, you know? And I thought, ‘My God, my God, how do I fix this?’ So I asked her to go and change the skirt so that I could finish the shoot. When it was all over she told me that “Daddy wants you to come down for a sandwich with him before you leave”. By which time I’m a nervous wreck. I have no assistant so I grab all my gear and go downstairs. I opened the door to the banqueting hall to be greeted by a scene straight out of the 18th century with all of these local English aristocrats dressed to go out shooting and all carrying guns. I immediately felt incredibly uncomfortable because only moments before I’d been upstairs wiping sweat from the daughters skirt and now here I am confronted by this improbable scene. I took one bite of my sandwich, said made a hasty goodbye to everyone’s amazement, jumped into my car and in my haste to leave I drove straight across the flowerbed in front of the house whilst waving goodbye out of the window with my free hand.

S&L. What a story!

GG. And I no longer have the picture that goes with that story. It was an unusual experience because on that day I completely freaked and under those circumstances I felt the weight of who I was because I was right in the heart of the British aristocracy.

S&L.  Well why not follow that tale with the story behind the man with a camera in the tank of water?

GG. Now that’s in America, LA.

Underwater Camera, Los Angeles

Underwater Camera, Los Angeles

GG. I was driving along and saw a sign saying ‘Underwater Cameras’. I was bored and thought it looked promising so I went in with no intention to take a picture. I told the owner I was working on the 24LA book project and that I wanted to see his underwater cameras. He took me to the back of the building then suddenly removed his trousers in front of me. I went, ‘Jesus Christ, I’ve stepped into a Los Angeles problem.’ Anyway he then climbed up behind the tank and jumped in whilst trying to explain with signs how to use the camera. I was just fascinated with his gesticulations so I asked him if he’d do it all again so that I could set up my camera & lights.

GG. Jeremy Irons on the other hand was having a row with a neighbour when I did this shot. And he was also in character for a play that he was doing so was talking to me like an 18th century gentleman.

Jeremy Irons

Jeremy Irons

S&L. Now let’s move on to George Melly, that shot stands out for me.

GG. Ah…but George Melly is easy though.

S&L. Maybe, but it’s full of life & passion.

George Melly

George Melly

GG. I would get on well with performers because it wouldn’t take much to whip them up. All I had to do with him was to get him to march up & down the room, back and forth, back and forth. We put some music on and he just enjoyed it. I like it because it’s a powerful image of him, it says what it is of him. And he related to me because we fucking finished off a half a bottle of whiskey before shooting!

S&L. (Laughs)

GG. And Ray Davies of the Kinks, he and I found a lot in common because we both lived in Muswell Hill. I like it because it’s a strong portrait that I did in his studio.

Ray Davies

Ray Davies

S&L. Muswell Hillbillies then.

GG. Everyone I photographed said they enjoyed it and that I was the quickest photographer in the world.

Postscript

It’s worth bearing in mind that after he retired Gil threw his entire archive in the trash! All that remains is but a small fragment of his overall output.

The techie stuff:

Hasselblad 500C/M with 40mm, 50mm, 80mm & 150mm Zeiss lenses. Multiblitz portable lights and Norman battery operated flash. Kodak Ektachrome 64 and later Fuji 100D then Fuji Provia 100D whilst proofing with Polaroid Type 668 or 699.

All images © Guglielmo Galvin

The web links:

http://guglielmogalvin.com

Martin Plimmer’s obituary of Gil in The Guardian

Gil’s work in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery

And the closing shot…

Paul and Kim Denman

Paul and Kim Denman

Leave a comment

Filed under The Interview